Adam Sherratt

Adam Sherratt is a professional landscape and wildlife photographer based in the UK.  His photographic works have been featured in magazines and exhibitions, and featured on Ordnance Survey map covers.  Adam travels the UK photographing wildlife and seeking some of the finest landscapes in the world, with a soft spot for the Peak District and the Isle of Skye   Also working as part of DialledInUk, Adam spends many weekends photographing mountain bike races.  Adam is available for bespoke photoshoots, workshops, and  editing training.  If you are interested, get in touch at

www.facebook.com/adamsherrattphotography

adam.sherratt@gmail.com

Exciting News!  You can now adorn your walls with giant sized murals of my photography!  You can get a photographic wall mural of some of my photos at Azutura.  If you don't see the photo you want on there, get in touch and we'll try and get it sorted!

  • Derwent Water, Lake District

    Autumnal colours were in full force at Derwent Water in the Lake District. Seen here from the Keswick end where the conditions were very changeable. Big skies and calm waters make for some dramatic photography

  • Derwent Water, Lake District

    Autumnal colours were in full force at Derwent Water in the Lake District. Seen here from the Keswick end where the conditions were very changeable. Big skies and calm waters make for some dramatic photography

  • Derwent Water, Lake District

    Autumnal colours were in full force at Derwent Water in the Lake District. Seen here from the Keswick end where the conditions were very changeable. Big skies and calm waters make for some dramatic photography

  • Rydal Water

    Autumn in the Lake District is very special, but if you are not local is a total lottery as to whether you are lucky enough to get the conditions you want at the point you visit. With very changeable light and conditions I tried on a number of occasions to capture the autumn colours and still waters (for reflections) at Rydal Water. It just wasn't to be for the still water, however the changeable conditions certainly added some dram

  • Rydal Water

    Autumn in the Lake District is very special, but if you are not local is a total lottery as to whether you are lucky enough to get the conditions you want at the point you visit. With very changeable light and conditions I tried on a number of occasions to capture the autumn colours and still waters (for reflections) at Rydal Water. It just wasn't to be for the still water, however the changeable conditions certainly added some dram

  • Derwent Water, Lake District

    Autumnal colours were in full force at Derwent Water in the Lake District. Seen here from the Keswick end where the conditions were very changeable. Big skies and calm waters make for some dramatic photography

  • The Ladybower Plughole - Peak District National Park

    The Ladybower Reservoir plugholes, the reservoirs overspill, are usually active between October and February when the water levels are at their peak. A photograph cannot convey all of the senses that one experiences when seeing these plugholes active. The noise is amazing, somehow like a waterfall amplified. Then there is the sense of danger, being sucked into the unknown. Add to this the view of one of the prettier areas of the Peak District National Park and you have a perfect location for some photography. I would recommend an early morning shoot at this location, when there is still some mist in the air and a chance of a sunrise. On a golden morning the sun light fills the plughole with colour something that is on my list of shots to get. Ladybower Reservoir is a the lowest of 3 reservoirs in the Upper Derwent Valley. The waters of the River Derwent flow through Howden Reservoir, then Derwent, and eventually into Ladybower. Built between 1935 and 1943 to bolster the water supply to the East Midlands, the reservoir took two years to fill. Beneath the waters of Ladybower is the site of the village of Ashopton. The buildings, with the exception of the church, were demolished during the construction phase of the reservoir. The clock tower of the church was visible above the water line until it was eventually demolished due to safety fears. The area is an amazing place to visit, with walking, cycling and fishing chief amongst the visitor activities. If you do visit the reservoirs I would recommend getting into the area early and taking advantage of the many free parking locations. There is also a very good visitors centre at Fairholmes with toilet facilities and a café (open all year round except Christmas day!).

  • Loughrigg Tarn

    A beautiful "angry" sunset over the still waters of Loughrigg Tarn, Skelwith Bridge, Lake District National Park.

  • Low Crag, Seathwaite

    Low clouds hanging over Low Crag, Seathwaite, Lake Dristrict National Park

  • Surprise View, Derwent Water, Keswick

    The classic view of Derwent Water from Surprise View. A blanket of thick grey cloud had hung over the lake all week, finally getting some sunset light on our last night in the area.

  • Penarth Peir

    The streetlight on the immaculately kept Victorian Pier at Penarth. The Pier was restored after a serious of disastrous events, including a fire and being hit by a boat! Now the boardwalk is beautiful, with cast iron railings and beautiful benches. The local council also seem to understand symmetry, and a photographers need for perfection. There are no stray bins, the benches align. Amazing place.

  • Beautiful cloud inversion at Chrome Hill in the Peak District National Park

    Photographers taking in the sunrise, above the clouds. The valley below is full of fog, caused by a temperature inversion, warm air trapping the fog on the valley floor. This image was taken at Chrome Hill in the Peak District National Park on an amazing September morning in 2017. I had been chasing conditions like this for a long time, but the forecast hadn’t predicted it. However, I decided to take a chance, and for once it paid off. The valley fog was perfect for the “Dragons Backbone” shot that I want, a shot that is also within this gallery. The fog then thickened really quickly, covering Parkhouse Hill within a matter of minutes, leaving me with only one option, to head up Chrome Hill. Thankfully, this was the reward for the lung busting climb. A sea of dense valley fog, as far as the eye could see.

  • Crashing Waves

    Crashing waves at Cape Cornwall, a few miles down the road from St Just. This area of the Cornish coastline, owned by the National Trust, is a regularly battered by the Atlantic winds and waves, with thick sea fogs rolling in on a regular basis. The Cape is the most Westerly point of England, marked by a monument on top of the cliffs. Around the cove there are old fishermans huts providing great photographic interest in the right conditions.

  • The Malham Tree

    The lone tree at Malham, forcing it's way through the jagged limestone pavement, both having withstood the tests of time on the exposed North Yorkshire hill.

  • LLynnau Cregennan

    A beautiful lake in the Welsh mountains near Barmouth. This stunning location was so peaceful, giving perfect reflections.

  • Neist Point - Isle Of Skye

    The incredible Neist Point on the Isle of Skye. This is a much photographed location, so finding an original shot is almost impossible to do. Fortunately however this is a spot of ever changing light and weather conditions, so you are always in for a treat. There are three main spots to shoot here. The first (this shot) is from the high cliffs, easily accessible from the car park. The second is from the ridge below, which allows the cliffs to loom above the horizon. The third is from underneath the lighthouse itself. These last two shots are missing from my portfolio, something that I need to rectify very soon!

  • Porth Nanven - Cornwall

    Porth Nanven Cove is one of Cornwall's hidden gems. Predominantly rocky beaches are found at the end of a very long single track, and in places very narrow, road. The nearest village is St Just, about 5 miles away. You can walk the coastal paths to Porth Nanven, with Cape Cornwall to the North. Reaching the end of the road the beaches open up from steep valley sides. Round boulders and jagged rocks give great foreground interest as the Atlantic waves come crashing in

  • Buachaille Etive Mòr

    This amazing triangular shaped mountain is Buachaille Etive Mòr, one of Scotlands most famous landmarks. This mountain is one of Munro peaks, standing at over 1000m tall. The mountain is actually at the end of a long ridge, although when viewed from this viewpoint, close to the A82, it looks to be standing alone. The river in the foreground is the River Coupall, at this point is tumbling over huge boulders and cascading in a series of falls. The water levels in these photographs was actually fairly low. When in spate, the water covers these rocks entirely.

  • The Curve - Torisde Reservoir - Peak District National Park

    The curved overflow of Torside Reservoir in the Peak District National Park provides a wonderful location for some long exposure photography. The spillway is easily accessed by walking along the top of the reservoir, however framing the photograph is a bit of a nightmare due to a high wall and a messy foreground. The spot is also quite exposed so you may get some strong winds which is not useful for a shot like this! I love the beautiful colour of this shot, caused by the low sun shining through dense cloud, creating an overcast purple light.

  • The Fisherman - Ladybower Reservoir - Peak District National Park

    A lone fisherman enjoying the last light of the day whilst fishing off the floating dock at Ladybower Reservoir. Ladybower Reservoir is a the lowest of 3 reservoirs in the Upper Derwent Valley. The waters of the River Derwent flow through Howden Reservoir, then Derwent, and eventually into Ladybower. Built between 1935 and 1943 to bolster the water supply to the East Midlands, the reservoir took two years to fill. Beneath the waters of Ladybower is the site of the village of Ashopton. The buildings, with the exception of the church, were demolished during the construction phase of the reservoir. The clock tower of the church was visible above the water line until it was eventually demolished due to safety fears. The area is an amazing place to visit, with walking, cycling and fishing chief amongst the visitor activities. If you do visit the reservoirs I would recommend getting into the area early and taking advantage of the many free parking locations. There is also a very good visitors centre at Fairholmes with toilet facilities and a café (open all year round except Christmas day!).

  • Fountains Abbey Cellarium Arches Spiders

    The famous arches of Fountains Abbey Cellarium provide a wonderful, spider-like focal point to a room so full of detail and light. The arched windows light the vaulted ceiling, casting a lattice work of shadow. The architecture in this room is simply incredible. Fountains Abbey is near to Ripon, in Yorkshire. Jointly owned and managed by the National Trustand English Heritage<, this site is easily a full day to explore. With the ruins of the abbey, a working water mill, the old manor house, Studley Church, the river side walk, deer park, the photographic options are endless.

  • Dunstanburgh - Northumberland

    Dunstanburgh Castle in Northumberland. This English Heritage site is home to the amazing castle, built around the 1300's, as well as the impressive rugged coastline. This is one of the rare East Coast sunset locations in the area, so is well worth checking out.

  • Ashopton Viaduct - Peak District National Park

    This shot was taken on the shoreline of Ladybower Reservoir in the Peak District National Park at sunset. The sun was almost gone for the day, leaving the incredible colours in the sky which were reflected in the water. Using a long exposure time helped to smooth that water and to bring out the colours even more. A beautiful, calm moment reflected in this photograph. Ladybower Reservoir is a the lowest of 3 reservoirs in the Upper Derwent Valley. The waters of the River Derwent flow through Howden Reservoir, then Derwent, and eventually into Ladybower. Built between 1935 and 1943 to bolster the water supply to the East Midlands, the reservoir took two years to fill. Beneath the waters of Ladybower is the site of the village of Ashopton. The buildings, with the exception of the church, were demolished during the construction phase of the reservoir. The clock tower of the church was visible above the water line until it was eventually demolished due to safety fears. The area is an amazing place to visit, with walking, cycling and fishing chief amongst the visitor activities. If you do visit the reservoirs I would recommend getting into the area early and taking advantage of the many free parking locations. There is also a very good visitors centre at Fairholmes with toilet facilities and a café (open all year round except Christmas day!).

  • The Dragons Backbone - Chrome Hill - Peak District National Park

    This is the image that I wanted to capture of Chrome Hill. A valley full of rolling fog, predawn light, and mystery a-plenty. This ridgeline is call the Dragons Backbone for fairly obvious reasons. I wanted a shot that encapsulated all of the aspects of a dragon, the ridge, the fire (in the sky) and the smoke (fog). Chrome Hill in the Peak District National Park is rapidly becoming a popular location for photographers as it is fairly accessible and just happens to be one of the 2016 Landscape Photographer Of the Year winning locations! On this particular morning shortly after I captured this shot the valley filled with dense fog, leaving me with only one option, to head uphill to try and get above it. The view from the top was stunning, and many of those shots can be seen in my gallery. The whole area, as far as the eye could see, was covered in thick fog caused by a temperature inversion. This is where warm air traps cold air underneath it, not allowing the moisture to rise, causing dense fog. An incredible view, a moment to remember, and it all started with this simple shot, of the Dragons Backbone.

  • Miradouro do Curtado, Madeira

    An amazing view from the roadside. Many of the coastal roads have huge vertical drops, plunging valleys and huge, expansive views. This one, overlooking the village of Faial to the peak at Miradouro da Penha D'Aguia, is simply spectacular.

  • Funchal Harbour, Madeira

    The harbour, seen from a boat trip (Ventura, Nature Emotions) as the sun was starting to dip. I love the oily golden light cast across the sea

  • Madeira

    The eastern end of Maderia, seen from a boat trip (Ventura, Nature Emotions)

  • Funchal, Madeira

    The town of Funchal, Madeira, rises steeply from the coast into the mountains behind. Mornings tend to be clear skies, with clouds rolling in throughout the afternoon in the heat, blanketing the hills and giving real mood.

  • Funchal, Madeira

    The town of Funchal, Madeira, rises steeply from the coast into the mountains behind. Mornings tend to be clear skies, with clouds rolling in throughout the afternoon in the heat, blanketing the hills and giving real mood.

  • Bradgate Park Sunset - Skyefire

    This is a multi-shot panoramic photograph of a most incredible sunset, seen from Bradgate Park near Loughborough in Leicestershire. The clouds were drawing in, thick and dark, threatening rain. The sun, peaking through, a flare, illuminated the clouds around it as if they were on fire. One brief flame and then it was gone.

  • Camacha, Madeira

    Whilst walking one of the Lavadas (drainage/irrigation channels) on Madeira to Camacha, the clouds descended, enveloping us and adding a real mood. The villages in the mountains are a real mixture of properties, with nice, expensive estates intermingling with decaying structures and plantations.

  • Camacha, Madeira

    Whilst walking one of the Lavadas (drainage/irrigation channels) on Madeira to Camacha, the clouds descended, enveloping us and adding a real mood. The villages in the mountains are a real mixture of properties, with nice, expensive estates intermingling with decaying structures and plantations.

  • Camacha, Madeira

    Whilst walking one of the Lavadas (drainage/irrigation channels) on Madeira to Camacha, the clouds descended, enveloping us and adding a real mood. The villages in the mountains are a real mixture of properties, with nice, expensive estates intermingling with decaying structures and plantations.

  • Camacha, Madeira

    Whilst walking one of the Lavadas (drainage/irrigation channels) on Madeira to Camacha, the clouds descended, enveloping us and adding a real mood. The villages in the mountains are a real mixture of properties, with nice, expensive estates intermingling with decaying structures and plantations.

  • LLynnau Cregennan

    A beautiful lake in the Welsh mountains near Barmouth. This stunning location was so peaceful, giving perfect reflections.

  • The Sligachan Old Bridge - Isle of Skye

    If the Isle of Skye were a wheel then Sligachan would be the hub. Skye's roads essentially branch out from Sligachan, with all traffic having to pass through this area. The Old Bridge, which sits next to the new main road bridge, is an ancient pack horse bridge, spanning the River Sligachan, This bridge is entirely unsuitable for modern day traffic, so now is just the perfect subject matter for landscape photographs.

  • The Old Man of Storr - Isle of Skye

    The North-East Coastline of Skye is one of ridges, rocks, and cliffs. The Trotternish Ridge, created during an ancient landslide and sculptured over the eons by wind, rain and snow, is an amazing place. Featured in many feature films, often as an alien landscape, this ridge line is a spectacular location for photographs. The Old Man of Storr is a pinnacle of rock high up on the ridge, just below the sheer cliff face. Visible from miles around, this landmark is an absolute must see for all photographer. The climb up is from around 150m above sea level, to approximately 500m. With steep gradients and icy paths, this climb is an epic, especially when you consider the need to be carrying all of your photography equipment. We set out for this location at approximately 3am, arriving at the car park at around 3:30. And so began the long, hard slog to the top. The conditions weren't too bad. Although cold, it wasn't overly windy. The skies were clear and full of stars. However the recent snowfall had covered the paths and in places set solid as ice. We didn't always know where the trail was, hidden by the snow, and so were cutting out way upwards, always keeping the Storr in sight. We passed the Storr on the way up to the viewpoint, wanting to be beyond it for the best view. The sounds of falling rocks all around, mixing with our rasping breath was a sharp reminder of how remote a spot this was. The snow had completely masked the path over to the viewpoint, however there was a thin line of footprints, indication that some other photographer was over there. We made our way over, the path collapsing with every step, and onto the viewpoint, just in time for sunrise. And what a sunrise it was. Full of pinks, oranges, vibrant blues. The kind of sunrise you get in the purest air. Stunning. A moment to treasure, a real sense of achievement.

  • The Old Man of Storr - Isle of Skye

    The North-East Coastline of Skye is one of ridges, rocks, and cliffs. The Trotternish Ridge, created during an ancient landslide and sculptured over the eons by wind, rain and snow, is an amazing place. Featured in many feature films, often as an alien landscape, this ridge line is a spectacular location for photographs. The Old Man of Storr is a pinnacle of rock high up on the ridge, just below the sheer cliff face. Visible from miles around, this landmark is an absolute must see for all photographer. The climb up is from around 150m above sea level, to approximately 500m. With steep gradients and icy paths, this climb is an epic, especially when you consider the need to be carrying all of your photography equipment. We set out for this location at approximately 3am, arriving at the car park at around 3:30. And so began the long, hard slog to the top. The conditions weren't too bad. Although cold, it wasn't overly windy. The skies were clear and full of stars. However the recent snowfall had covered the paths and in places set solid as ice. We didn't always know where the trail was, hidden by the snow, and so were cutting out way upwards, always keeping the Storr in sight. We passed the Storr on the way up to the viewpoint, wanting to be beyond it for the best view. The sounds of falling rocks all around, mixing with our rasping breath was a sharp reminder of how remote a spot this was. The snow had completely masked the path over to the viewpoint, however there was a thin line of footprints, indication that some other photographer was over there. We made our way over, the path collapsing with every step, and onto the viewpoint, just in time for sunrise. And what a sunrise it was. Full of pinks, oranges, vibrant blues. The kind of sunrise you get in the purest air. Stunning. A moment to treasure, a real sense of achievement.

  • The Old Man of Storr - Isle of Skye

    The North-East Coastline of Skye is one of ridges, rocks, and cliffs. The Trotternish Ridge, created during an ancient landslide and sculptured over the eons by wind, rain and snow, is an amazing place. Featured in many feature films, often as an alien landscape, this ridge line is a spectacular location for photographs. The Old Man of Storr is a pinnacle of rock high up on the ridge, just below the sheer cliff face. Visible from miles around, this landmark is an absolute must see for all photographer. The climb up is from around 150m above sea level, to approximately 500m. With steep gradients and icy paths, this climb is an epic, especially when you consider the need to be carrying all of your photography equipment. We set out for this location at approximately 3am, arriving at the car park at around 3:30. And so began the long, hard slog to the top. The conditions weren't too bad. Although cold, it wasn't overly windy. The skies were clear and full of stars. However the recent snowfall had covered the paths and in places set solid as ice. We didn't always know where the trail was, hidden by the snow, and so were cutting out way upwards, always keeping the Storr in sight. We passed the Storr on the way up to the viewpoint, wanting to be beyond it for the best view. The sounds of falling rocks all around, mixing with our rasping breath was a sharp reminder of how remote a spot this was. The snow had completely masked the path over to the viewpoint, however there was a thin line of footprints, indication that some other photographer was over there. We made our way over, the path collapsing with every step, and onto the viewpoint, just in time for sunrise. And what a sunrise it was. Full of pinks, oranges, vibrant blues. The kind of sunrise you get in the purest air. Stunning. A moment to treasure, a real sense of achievement.

  • Winter by the Sea

    Seaside towns in winter are bleak places, when the crowds are gone there is only a sense of emptiness.

  • The Sligachan Old Bridge - Isle of Skye

    If the Isle of Skye were a wheel then Sligachan would be the hub. Skye's roads essentially branch out from Sligachan, with all traffic having to pass through this area. The Old Bridge, which sits next to the new main road bridge, is an ancient pack horse bridge, spanning the River Sligachan, This bridge is entirely unsuitable for modern day traffic, so now is just the perfect subject matter for landscape photographs.

  • Buachaille Etive Mòr

    This amazing triangular shaped mountain is Buachaille Etive Mòr, one of Scotlands most famous landmarks. This mountain is one of Munro peaks, standing at over 1000m tall. The mountain is actually at the end of a long ridge, although when viewed from this viewpoint, close to the A82, it looks to be standing alone. The river in the foreground is the River Coupall, at this point is tumbling over huge boulders and cascading in a series of falls. The water levels in these photographs was actually fairly low. When in spate, the water covers these rocks entirely.

  • Buachaille Etive Mòr

    This amazing triangular shaped mountain is Buachaille Etive Mòr, one of Scotlands most famous landmarks. This mountain is one of Munro peaks, standing at over 1000m tall. The mountain is actually at the end of a long ridge, although when viewed from this viewpoint, close to the A82, it looks to be standing alone. The river in the foreground is the River Coupall, at this point is tumbling over huge boulders and cascading in a series of falls. The water levels in these photographs was actually fairly low. When in spate, the water covers these rocks entirely.

  • Buachaille Etive Mòr

    This amazing triangular shaped mountain is Buachaille Etive Mòr, one of Scotlands most famous landmarks. This mountain is one of Munro peaks, standing at over 1000m tall. The mountain is actually at the end of a long ridge, although when viewed from this viewpoint, close to the A82, it looks to be standing alone. The river in the foreground is the River Coupall, at this point is tumbling over huge boulders and cascading in a series of falls. The water levels in these photographs was actually fairly low. When in spate, the water covers these rocks entirely.

  • The Ladybower Plughole - Peak District National Park

    The Ladybower Reservoirplugholes, the reservoirs overspill, are usually active between October and February when the water levels are at their peak. A photograph cannot convey all of the senses that one experiences when seeing these plugholes active. The noise is amazing, somehow like a waterfall amplified. Then there is the sense of danger, being sucked into the unknown. Add to this the view of one of the prettier areas of the Peak District National Park and you have a perfect location for some photography. I would recommend an early morning shoot at this location, when there is still some mist in the air and a chance of a sunrise. On a golden morning the sun light fills the plughole with colour something that is on my list of shots to get. Ladybower Reservoir is a the lowest of 3 reservoirs in the Upper Derwent Valley. The waters of the River Derwent flow through Howden Reservoir, then Derwent, and eventually into Ladybower. Built between 1935 and 1943 to bolster the water supply to the East Midlands, the reservoir took two years to fill. Beneath the waters of Ladybower is the site of the village of Ashopton. The buildings, with the exception of the church, were demolished during the construction phase of the reservoir. The clock tower of the church was visible above the water line until it was eventually demolished due to safety fears. The area is an amazing place to visit, with walking, cycling and fishing chief amongst the visitor activities. If you do visit the reservoirs I would recommend getting into the area early and taking advantage of the many free parking locations. There is also a very good visitors centre at Fairholmes with toilet facilities and a café (open all year round except Christmas day!).

  • The Ladybower Plughole - Peak District National Park

    The Ladybower Reservoirplugholes, the reservoirs overspill, are usually active between October and February when the water levels are at their peak. A photograph cannot convey all of the senses that one experiences when seeing these plugholes active. The noise is amazing, somehow like a waterfall amplified. Then there is the sense of danger, being sucked into the unknown. Add to this the view of one of the prettier areas of the Peak District National Park and you have a perfect location for some photography. I would recommend an early morning shoot at this location, when there is still some mist in the air and a chance of a sunrise. On a golden morning the sun light fills the plughole with colour something that is on my list of shots to get. Ladybower Reservoir is a the lowest of 3 reservoirs in the Upper Derwent Valley. The waters of the River Derwent flow through Howden Reservoir, then Derwent, and eventually into Ladybower. Built between 1935 and 1943 to bolster the water supply to the East Midlands, the reservoir took two years to fill. Beneath the waters of Ladybower is the site of the village of Ashopton. The buildings, with the exception of the church, were demolished during the construction phase of the reservoir. The clock tower of the church was visible above the water line until it was eventually demolished due to safety fears. The area is an amazing place to visit, with walking, cycling and fishing chief amongst the visitor activities. If you do visit the reservoirs I would recommend getting into the area early and taking advantage of the many free parking locations. There is also a very good visitors centre at Fairholmes with toilet facilities and a café (open all year round except Christmas day!).

  • The Dragons Backbone - Chrome Hill - Peak District National Park

    This is the image that I wanted to capture of Chrome Hill. A valley full of rolling fog, predawn light, and mystery a-plenty. This ridgeline is call the Dragons Backbone for fairly obvious reasons. I wanted a shot that encapsulated all of the aspects of a dragon, the ridge, the fire (in the sky) and the smoke (fog). Chrome Hill in the Peak District National Park is rapidly becoming a popular location for photographers as it is fairly accessible and just happens to be one of the 2016 Landscape Photographer Of the Year winning locations! On this particular morning shortly after I captured this shot the valley filled with dense fog, leaving me with only one option, to head uphill to try and get above it. The view from the top was stunning, and many of those shots can be seen in my gallery. The whole area, as far as the eye could see, was covered in thick fog caused by a temperature inversion. This is where warm air traps cold air underneath it, not allowing the moisture to rise, causing dense fog. An incredible view, a moment to remember, and it all started with this simple shot, of the Dragons Backbone.

Fine Art Landscape and Wildlife Photography 

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